shoomlah

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

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So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

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It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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Read More

yamino

yamino:

lissabt:

My two (two!) pieces for the "Magical Girl Heroines: Sailor Moon and Sailor Senshi"gallery show, happening THIS SATURDAY (that’s tomorrow!) at Q-Pop in lovely downtown Los Angeles! The art i’ve already seen for this show looks AMAZING and i’m super pumped to be part of it along with many talented pals and talented potential-future-pals.

I love this style! <333
And I love seeing post-battle beat-up tired Sailors. XD

feminist-space
feminist-space:

fabulousworkinprogress:

applejackismyhomegirl:

seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.
 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"

woooooww “prolife” priorities…. $500k could:
pay for prenatal care for 250 kidspay for one year of OTC birth control pills for 833 peoplepay for one year of child care for 41 childrenbuy one year’s worth of baby formula for 520 babiesbuy 10,000 packs of diapersbut hey i guess the whole glass house thing is cool too

Hey at least they completed the metaphor by putting it in a glass house.


Ha!

feminist-space:

fabulousworkinprogress:

applejackismyhomegirl:

seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.

 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"

woooooww “prolife” priorities…. $500k could:

pay for prenatal care for 250 kids
pay for one year of OTC birth control pills for 833 people
pay for one year of child care for 41 children
buy one year’s worth of baby formula for 520 babies
buy 10,000 packs of diapers

but hey i guess the whole glass house thing is cool too

Hey at least they completed the metaphor by putting it in a glass house.

Ha!

fandomsandfeminism

inquisitivefeminist:

projectqueer:

“‘Kids are kicked out of their homes just for being who they are,’ is how the saying goes, well let me offer another possibility that I’ve heard far too often: a parent learns that a son or daughter is claiming to be gay but an underage child still lives at home, so the now-heartbroken parent puts new restrictions on some of the activities like for instance, the teen is no longer going to be having sleepovers with that same-sex friend, or if the friend is a college student or has an apartment, visits over there will not be permitted.

"What does the teen do? It may become a fight where the teen storms out by choice and leaves voluntarily because the homosexual relationship is more important than that of his or her parents. And when that all-important relationship ends, the teen is too stubborn or already too-involved in alcohol or drugs or the premature independence of the homosexual life and he or she would rather drift than return home. It’s not always the case of course but personal decisions are at the heart of these issues."

— Hate group leader Linda Harvey, claiming on her radio show last week that LGBT youth homelessness is actually the fault of LGBT youth.

HOLY SHIT

DESTROY THIS WOMAN

checkprivilege
subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless
LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”
LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”
LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology
LATISHA: means “happiness”
TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”
ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”
KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”
LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.
MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”
NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”
MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”
NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.
AYANA&#160;: Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”
SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”
SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”
TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”
TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”
AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”  Hindu. name meaning “immortal.” African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”
CHICHI f Western African, Igbo Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.
IMANI f &amp; m Eastern African, Swahili, African American Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.
DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.” African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew
BIBI&#160;: An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”
ADA&#160;: Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.
ZENA&#160;: Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”
JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.” Arabic, Muslim, African
KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.” African
RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means “Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”
TAJ means “Crown.” Indian,Sanskrit, African
FATUMA&#160;: Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”
NANA&#160;: Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”
AJA&#160;: High Priestess of Mecca.
ADINA&#160;: Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”
BALINDA&#160;: A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)
FANTA&#160;: Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”
KAYA&#160;: Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”
LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA&#160;: Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”
SHANI&#160;: Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”
ANAYA&#160;: Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”
TANISHA , TANI&#160;: Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”
ZAKIYA&#160;: Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”
TITI&#160;: Nigerian name meaning “flower.”
SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH&#160;: Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”
LULU&#160;: Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”
KADIJA , KHADIJA&#160;: Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”
AMINA&#160;: Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.

subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless

LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”

LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”

LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology

LATISHA: means “happiness”

TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”

ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”

KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”

LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.

MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”

NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”

MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”

NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.

AYANA : Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”

SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”

SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”

TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”

TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”

AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”
Hindu. name meaning “immortal.”
African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”

CHICHI f Western African, Igbo
Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.

IMANI f & m Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.

AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.

DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.”
African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew

BIBI : An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”

ADA : Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.

ZENA : Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”

JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.”
Arabic, Muslim, African

KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.”
African

RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means
“Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”

TAJ means “Crown.”
Indian,Sanskrit, African

FATUMA : Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”

NANA : Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”

AJA : High Priestess of Mecca.

ADINA : Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”

BALINDA : A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)

FANTA : Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”

KAYA : Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”

LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”

SHANI : Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”

ANAYA : Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”

TANISHA , TANI : Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”

ZAKIYA : Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”

TITI : Nigerian name meaning “flower.”

SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH : Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”

LULU : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”

KADIJA , KHADIJA : Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”

AMINA : Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.